London Westminster & Middlesex Family History Society

Hornsey Parish church of St Mary
A once rural, now suburban village: but still retaining the some of its primitive features, two miles north east of Highgate, four miles from King's Cross by the Great Northern railway. Inns, the Three Compasses, by the church; great Northern Tavern, opposite the church; the Railway Hotel, by the station. In the 13th century the name was written Haringee Haringhee, or Haringy; in the E. reign of Elizabeth, Harnsey and Hornsey were used. Hornsey village is long, irregular, and scattered. By the church the street is broad, bordered by elms, and still rural; and the rural character is preserved in the lanes that run off from it, as it is in the extension of the main street towards Muswell Hill. Along the lanes are many god old houses half-hidden behind tall elms, so-called villas are rising on every side. the New River meanders in devious fashion through the valley. The fields, though fast diminishing, as still pleasant, and the heights on either hand afford wide prospects: the new Alexandra Palace is of course conspicuous from all of them.
The church, St Mary, looks better a distance than close at hand. The old ivy-covered tower is attractive object from the neighbouring heights, and picturesque when near; but the body of the church is brick, and Gothic of the year 1833. The old church was pulled down in 1832. The tower, the only part left of the old church is of reddish sandstone, square, embattled, with a newel turret at the north-west angle, and has on it the arms of Savage (1497-1500), and Warham (1500-4), successively bishops of London, thus fixing the date of its erection. In the tower is a peal of six bells. The interior of the church is kept in excellent order. Several of the windows have painted glass.
Other churches: Christ Church, Crouch End
St Andrew's Mission Chapel, Shepherds Hill
St James, Muswell Hill
St Matthew, Muswell Hill
St Paul, Burgoyne Road, Harringay
St Peter, Wightman Road